NaNoWriMo Prep: Step Three, Plotting Characters

NaNoWriMo2016

I’m going to get to the character part, but first I’m going to take a quick side step. What have you not prepped for that has nothing to do with writing in November?

  • You have told family and friends that you will not be socializing unless it’s at a write-in
  • You have told family and friends you can manage fifteen minutes of socializing at a time IF they bring food and caffeine
  • You have stocked up on foodstuffs, either freezer meals, pre-made dinners, cash for eating out, or family/friends bribery
  • You are prepared to do one very good, deep housecleaning on the week of November 1st and then to just to touch-ups during breaks for an entire month
  • You have shunted laundry duty to the spousal unit, children, or paid person. Or parental unit. Barring that, you have figured out how to do laundry between sprints.
  • You know how to ninja write at the table while socializing during Thanksgiving.
  • You already purchased Christmas presents (or you can deal with the “after Thanksgiving” rush)
  • You figured out how to write on your phone, tablet, laptop, desktop, and (if necessary) regular paper and will be carrying as many items of mass wordage on you as possible at all times.

Okay, now that we’re past all that, let’s talk character stuff.

There are, largely, two types of people when it comes to characters: there are those who write plot-driven stories and the characters are revealed by how they interact with the plot or there are those who write character-driven stories and the plot is revealed by how the characters would naturally behave in a situation. My theory is that plotters tend to be the former and pantsers tend to be the latter, but it’s not a hard and fast line.

If you are the former, you may not need to do a lot of character set-up ahead of time (which amuses me, since these are the plotters). Names. Rough character sheet. The rest will come to you.

If you are the latter, you may have detailed character sheets for each person who shows up in your novel. You may know more about your MC than a good stalker, maybe more than a good diary.

I have to admit, I’m a plot-driven writer. I learn about characters as I write, rather than making them up ahead of time. So I can’t help much with character development. But here are some sheets for those of you who like to have a handle on your characters before you write the first word.

However you choose to get to know your characters, at least get a name list and rough description list ahead of time.

Really. You’ll thank me later. Or send chocolate. Or books. Money would be fine. But… I’ll settle for thanks.

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